Photo show features anti-war campaigns in 1971

Cultural Correspondent
Photo show

Visitors look at a photograph at the show. — Snigdha Zaman

A photography exhibition featuring rare images of London-based expatriate Bangladeshis who contributed in different ways to the 1971 war of liberation is underway at the National Art Gallery of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
The show, ‘London 1971,’ has been organised by a London-based platform called Project London 1971.
It features more than a hundred documents including photographs, postage stamps, letters, and posters. Most of the photographs were taken by British photographer Roger Goyen and expatriate photographer Yousuf Chowdhury, while some were collected from different other sources.
The photographs offer a glimpse into how the expatriate Bangladeshis (then East Pakistanis) in London and the British people helped raise international awareness about the brutalities taking place in Bangladesh, and took to the streets in support of the oppressed people.
Also on display is an open letter written by the first prime minister of Bangladesh, Tajuddin Ahmed, to the expatriate Bengalis asking for their support in the war.
There is one picture showing hundreds of peace-loving people marching in procession to the London’s Trafalgar Square on August 1, 1971. In another procession, organised by Action Bangladesh, the demonstrators are seen holding placards including one that reads ‘Stop Genocide, Recognise Bangla Desh.’
An old newspaper cutting on display at the show discloses the news of the opening of the first Bangladeshi Mission in London on August 27, 1971.
Another photograph shows members of Women Association walking in procession in front of the British prime minister’s residence at 10 Dawning Street.
The three-day exhibition, inaugurated on Thursday by finance minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith in presence of cultural affairs minister Asaduzzaman Noor, will remain open for the public until later today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisement